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Pardon my Sarong (1942)

Pardon My Sarong color photo - Lou Costello, Bud Abbott

Editorial review of Abbot and Costello‘s Pardon My Sarong, courtesy of Amazon.com:

Abbott & Costello travel to the South Seas in this gag-filled exotic comedy. Screwball bus drivers Algy (Abbott) and Wellington (Costello) travel off the course yacht. A hurricane detours the craft to an uncharted island, inhabited by innocent natives and a sinister Dr. Varnoff (Lionel Atwill). Mistaken for a legendary god, Wellington is betrothed to a beautiful native girl (Nan Wynn), in the hilarious “Tree of Truth” scene.

Pardon My Sarong color photo – Lou Costello, Bud Abbott

Chosen to appease an angry volcano god, Wellington learns the volcano has been rigged by Varnoff and his men who plan to collect the gullible natives’ sacred jewel. Rising to the occasion, Wellington vanquishes the villain with feats of unbelievable athletic agility in this delightful South Seas caper.

Funny movie quotes from Pardon My Sarong

Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): [after being told he has to go into the temple on top of a volcano, from which no one has ever returned] I’ll go up there into that temple. I’ll face danger.
Algernon ‘Algy’ Shaw (Bud Abbott): I knew you would.
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): I don’t care if the boogeyman’s in there.
Algernon ‘Algy’ Shaw (Bud Abbott): Thatta boy.
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): There’s only one thing I want you to do.
Algernon ‘Algy’ Shaw (Bud Abbott): What’s that?
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): Talk me out of it.

[on marrying a homely girl versus a pretty girl]
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): A pretty girl is liable to run away.
Algernon ‘Algy’ Shaw (Bud Abbott): So is a homely girl.
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): Yeah, but who cares?

Varnoff (Lionel Atwill): How do you want to die?
Wellington Pflug, aka Moola (Lou Costello): Old age.

Trivia about Abbott and Costello’s Pardon My Sarong:

  • Universal had smash hits with Abbott and Costello’s service comedies. With this film, they tried to duplicate the box office success that Paramount was having with the Bing Crosby-Bob Hope “Road” pictures. The experiment worked and this film exceeded the box office grosses of their service comedies to become Abbott and Costello’s biggest hit to date.
  • This was the second highest grossing film of 1942
  • Originally titled ‘Road to Montezuma’.

Routines

  • Back up – go ahead
  • The Tree of Truth
  • Share and Share Alike
  • Swapping the cups

Cast of characters

  • Bud Abbott … Algy Shaw
  • Lou Costello … Wellington Pflug
  • Virginia Bruce (The Invisible Woman) … Joan Marshall
  • Robert Paige (Son of Dracula) … Tommy Layton. The playboy who hired Algy & Wellington to “charter” their bus. Later, he hires them as crew on his yacht race. Then, they all get stranded …. The romantic lead.
  • Lionel Atwill (The Vampire Bat, Son of Frankenstein) … Varnoff
  • Leif Erickson (Night Monster) … Whaba. He’s sweet on Luana, and doesn’t want her to marry Algy!
  • Nan Wynn (A Shot in the Dark) … Luana. Lovely island lady, who becomes sweet on Algy.
  • William Demarest (It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, All Through the Night) … Detective Kendall. After a zany backstage chase with magician’s props, he finally arrests Algy & Wellington for “borrowing” the bus.
  • Samuel S. Hinds (It’s a Wonderful Life, The Raven 1935) … Chief Kolua
  • Marie McDonald … Ferna
  • Janet Warren … Amo
  • The Ink Spots … Singers
  • Tip Tap & Toe … Three Dancers

Songs

  • Do I Worry, Written by Stanley Cowan and Bobby Worth. Played and sung by The Ink Spots at the Seaside Yacht Club
  • Shout, Brother, Shout, Written by Clarence Williams. Played and sung by The Ink Spots at the Seaside Yacht Club. Danced to by Tip Tap & Toe at the Seaside Yacht Club
  • Java Jive, Written by Milton Drake and Ben Oakland. Played and sung by The Ink Spots at the Seaside Yacht Club
  • Lovely Luana (1942) Written by Don Raye and Gene de Paul. Sung by Nan Wynn (uncredited) and the chorus of natives on the island
  • Vingo Jingo (1942) Written by Don Raye and Gene de Paul. Sung and danced to by Nan Wynn and the chorus of natives on the island
  • Deep in the Heart of Texas (1942) from Heart of the Rio Grande (1942) Music by Don Swander. Lyrics by June Hershey. One line sung a cappella by Lou Costello
  • Island of the Moon (1942) Written by Don Raye and Gene de Paul. Sung by an offscreen chorus at the end

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